(Source: thecontingency)

liquidnight:

Fay S. Lincoln 
 New York City: Bayonne Bridge: detail, 1932
Courtesy of the Penn State Special Collections Library
[via realityayslum]

liquidnight:

Fay S. Lincoln

New York City: Bayonne Bridge: detail, 1932

Courtesy of the Penn State Special Collections Library

[via realityayslum]

(Source: jotopblog)

etik-motorcycles:

“Héritage" Helmet

etik-motorcycles:

Héritage" Helmet

casadabiqueira:

The Flying Machine
Orville and Wilbur Wright, 1906

casadabiqueira:

The Flying Machine
Orville and Wilbur Wright, 1906

(Source: oneinchlunch)

septagonstudios:

Patrick Seymour

septagonstudios:

Patrick Seymour

breastmilkontherocks:

"Children are required to be in school, where their freedom is greatly restricted, far more than most adults would tolerate in their workplaces. In recent decades we’ve been compelling them to spend ever more time in this kind of setting, and there’s strong evidence that this is causing psychological damage to many of them. And as scientists have investigated how children naturally learn, they’ve realized that kids do so most deeply and fully, and with greatest enthusiasm, in conditions that are almost opposite to those of school….Most people assume that the basic design of today’s schools emerged from scientific evidence about how children learn. But nothing could be further from the truth. Schools as we know them today are a product of history, not research.   …. Research has shown that people of all ages learn best when they are self-motivated, pursuing answers to questions that reflect their personal interests and achieving goals that they’ve set for themselves. Under such conditions, learning is usually joyful. The evidence for all of this is obvious to anyone who’s watched a child grow from infancy to school age. Through their own efforts, children figure out how to walk, run, jump, and climb. They learn from scratch their native language, and with that, they learn to assert their will, argue, amuse, annoy, befriend, charm, and ask questions.  ….
They do all of this before anyone, in any systematic way, tries to teach them anything. This amazing drive and capacity to learn does not turn itself off when children reach five or six. But we turn it off with our coercive system of schooling.”

breastmilkontherocks:

"Children are required to be in school, where their freedom is greatly restricted, far more than most adults would tolerate in their workplaces. In recent decades we’ve been compelling them to spend ever more time in this kind of setting, and there’s strong evidence that this is causing psychological damage to many of them. And as scientists have investigated how children naturally learn, they’ve realized that kids do so most deeply and fully, and with greatest enthusiasm, in conditions that are almost opposite to those of school….
Most people assume that the basic design of today’s schools emerged from scientific evidence about how children learn. But nothing could be further from the truth.
Schools as we know them today are a product of history, not research.

….
Research has shown that people of all ages learn best when they are self-motivated, pursuing answers to questions that reflect their personal interests and achieving goals that they’ve set for themselves. Under such conditions, learning is usually joyful.
The evidence for all of this is obvious to anyone who’s watched a child grow from infancy to school age. Through their own efforts, children figure out how to walk, run, jump, and climb. They learn from scratch their native language, and with that, they learn to assert their will, argue, amuse, annoy, befriend, charm, and ask questions.
….

They do all of this before anyone, in any systematic way, tries to teach them anything.
This amazing drive and capacity to learn does not turn itself off when children reach five or six. But we turn it off with our coercive system of schooling.”

mpdrolet:

London, c. 1950s
Frederick Wilfred

mpdrolet:

London, c. 1950s

Frederick Wilfred

akimanart:

メイドさんのお使い
メイド長から受けた指令は時に過酷でそれなりの武装をしなければいけないときもあるわけです。去年の冬コミのピンナップとして制作しました。
「メイドさんのお使い」/「あきまん」のイラスト [pixiv]

akimanart:

メイドさんのお使い

メイド長から受けた指令は時に過酷でそれなりの武装をしなければいけないときもあるわけです。去年の冬コミのピンナップとして制作しました。

「メイドさんのお使い」/「あきまん」のイラスト [pixiv]

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Jim Kazanjian

Jim Kazanjian has worked professionally as a commercial CGI artist for the past 18 years in television and game production. His clients list include: Nike, Adidas, NBC, CBS, HBO, NASA, HP, Intel and others. He currently lives in Portland, Oregon. With photographs found online, Jim Kazanjian creates fantastical buildings using a famous software. “I am basically manipulating and assembling a disparate array of multiple photographs to produce a single homogenised image.” he says. Jim uses up to 50 different photographs in one image without shooting anything, it’s just recycling images.

http://www.kazanjian.net/

polaroidtransfers:

Heat to the Rescue: Sturdy Oil Drum Survival Kit Also Converts Into Stove.

Like the Haitian earthquake of 2010, last year’s Japanese tsunami disaster spurred designers to re-think what an effective, life-saving response might look like.

Focusing on providing a source of heat, water and food housed in rollable oil drum that can be converted into a stove, Eindhoven-based Japanese designer Hikaru Imamura’s “Heat Rescue Disaster Recovery” kit reflects his belief that something as simple as heat and hot water may mean the difference between falling deathly ill or surviving.

(Source: treehugger.com)